Cowichan Tribe Environmental Stewardship

Cowichan Tribe Environmental Stewardship

Re-starting up Canada’s only tree protector manufacturing facility is just one of several key for the environmental stewardship leadership roles that the Cowichan Tribes is taking as effort to mitigate the damage done to its Traditional Territory.  The tribes are spearheading enhanced fibre recovery on forest cut-blocks to reduce wood waste and slash burning emissions to create incremental employment in waste wood recovery, secondary lumber manufacturing, and renewable energy (natural gas) (i.e. one of several energy end-uses that the Cowichan Tribe is exploring with technology partners).  Within several years from the commencement of this fibre recovery pilot (launched in partnership with Mosaic Forests in 2019, wood waste and slash burning GHG emissions in the tribe’s Traditional Territory will be cut by over half and many new full-time jobs will be created.


Khowutzun Forest Services (KFS a wholly-owned reforestation/silviculture services company) did one of the first riparian restoration projects (on Summit Creek within KFS’s Community Forest Licence) that will improve ecosystem functionality, increase biodiversity, improve fish habitat and enhance carbon sequestration.  It was co-funded by the Forest Enhancement Society of BC or FESBC.  Presently, KFS is looking to launch similar projects along the Cowichan and Koksilah rivers and their tributaries.  Khowutzun Freegro™ tree shelters were used on the Summit Creek FESBC project and they will be an essential part of the success of any other similar riparian restoration project done by KFS or any other organization seeking to improve habitat and ecosystem functionality while substantially enhancing carbon sequestration.  KFT’s forester, John Kendall RPF, would be happy to explain how such projects can be planned, set-up and funded.  Coastal BC riparian areas have very high carbon and non carbon values (e.g. for reversing the trend in declining salmon stocks).  The risk of reversal by wildfire is very low compared to interior, non-riparian, sites.